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Cento to Autumn
 




Seasons of mist and mellow fruitfulness,
it's autumn again and I can do anything.
All day I have watched the purple vine leaves;
for every breath that stirs the trees
doth cause a leaf to fall,
silver slivers of blanching branches.
Even as a leaf, the year is withered.
Sing now the lusty song of fruits and flowers,
close bosom friend of the maturing sun.
Know'st thou not at the fall of a leaf
The trees are in their autumn beauty.
Then leaf subsides to leaf, so Eden sank to grief.
into the slate grey sky,
a crown of twigs to cover my head.
The nineteenth autumn has come upon me;
How the soul feels like a dried sheaf.

Autumn is like an old book, marred spines turn mean yellow.
The swallows, veering, skimmed the golden grain.
From the autumn bonfires see the smoke trail,
when yellow leaves, or none, or few do hang,
yellow and black and pale and hectic red,
the mother of the year, the taker of seeds.
Smell you the smell of the grapes on the vines?
Thou, from whose unseen presence the leaves dead.
Let me remember, soon the winter will be on us.
He says that leaves are old and that for flowers,
their dry leaves muttering imprecations.

Line

1 John Keats To Autumn
2 Dorothea Grossman In The Library
3 Amy Lowell Pictures of Fecundity
4&5 Elizabeth Barrett Browning The Autumn
6 Ruth Hill Autumn Colours in the Far North
7 Algernon Charles Swinburne Hendecasyllabics
8 William Blake To Autumn
9 John Keats To Autumn
10 Dante Gabriel Rossetti Autumn Song
11 William Butler Yeats The Wild Swans at Coole
12 Robert Frost Nothing Gold Can Stay
13 Judith A. Lawrence Autumn Offering
14 William Butler Yeats The Wild Swans at Coole
15 Dante Gabriel Rossetti Autumn Song
16 Mary Hamrick Autumn
17 Trumball Stickney Mnemosyne
18 Robert Louis Stevenson Autumn Fires
19 William Shakespeare Sonnet 73
20 Percy Bysshe Shelley Ode to The West Wind
21 Carl Sandburg Autumn Movement
22 Walt Whitman When I Heard at Close of the Day
23 Percy Bysshe Shelley Ode to The West Wind
24 Sarah Teasdale September Midnight
25 Robert Frost The Oven Bird
26 Christine Klocek-Lim Strange Violet Behind Trees



Form:

Cento

A cento is also called a patchwork or found poem.
It is made entirely of lines from other poets.
Centos are traditionally comic in nature. The only
lines you can use to create a cento are lines from
other poems. The lines you choose must stay just
as they are written, you cannot make any changes
or drop any words. All the poems can be by the same
poet. Look at an index of first lines. This is a great
source for writing a cento. You can repeat a line if
you wish. After your cento is complete, at the end
of it list the poem and poet for each line.The source
information will be as long as the poem.

Though cento indicates 100 lines, for our purposes
let's keep them 25 to fifty lines, thus making them
semi-centos.








By cherryk

© 2018 cherryk (All rights reserved)

 

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This Poem is part of a Challenge: - Form Poetry is Fun! 17 (challenge has been closed)


This Poem is part of a Challenge: - Form Poetry is Fun! 17 (challenge has been closed)


This Poem is part of a Challenge: - Form Poetry is Fun! 17 (challenge has been closed)


This Poem is part of a Challenge: - Form Poetry is Fun! 17 (challenge has been closed)


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